Lasting Powers of Attorney

The retired senior judge in the Court of Protection commented recently on the Today programme on BBC Radio 4 that people should think twice before executing a Lasting Power of Attorney (‘LPA’), because they might be served better by the appointment of a Deputy of the Court of Protection.

Lawyers have rushed to contradict this opinion, pointing out that the cost of a Deputyship is considerably greater, as is the likelihood of delay; and that most people would prefer their own appointee to one appointed by the Court. They also point out that LPAs are about more than money and can also provide the means of delegating decisions on health and welfare.

The judge’s comments may have been influenced by the fact that many of the cases which come before the court are ones in which LPAs have gone wrong, with appointees abusing their position.

Share this post

Share on facebook
Share on google
Share on twitter
Share on linkedin
Share on pinterest
Share on print
Share on email

This website uses cookies to ensure you get the best experience on our website.

Lasting Powers of Attorney

The retired senior judge in the Court of Protection commented recently on the Today programme on BBC Radio 4 that people should think twice before executing a Lasting Power of Attorney (‘LPA’), because they might be served better by the appointment of a Deputy of the Court of Protection.

Lawyers have rushed to contradict this opinion, pointing out that the cost of a Deputyship is considerably greater, as is the likelihood of delay; and that most people would prefer their own appointee to one appointed by the Court. They also point out that LPAs are about more than money and can also provide the means of delegating decisions on health and welfare.

The judge’s comments may have been influenced by the fact that many of the cases which come before the court are ones in which LPAs have gone wrong, with appointees abusing their position.